How to Succeed in Anything by Really Trying

Paperback $14.95

Jan 12, 2010 | 224 Pages

Ebook $11.99

Jan 05, 2010

  • Paperback $14.95

    Jan 12, 2010 | 224 Pages

  • Ebook $11.99

    Jan 05, 2010


“You can’t sit back and wait for things to happen — you have to make them happen. That’s the message of How to Succeed in Anything by Really Trying.”
The Calgary Herald

“Whether you’re a first-time speaker or an experienced one looking to further refine your technique, The Elements of Great Public Speaking is a must-read guide to delivering a memorable speech and leaving the audience wanting more.”
— Hon. Frank McKenna, former Canadian embassador to the United States

“A great book that really does set forth how to deliver high-energy presentations.”
— Mark M. Maria, author of Rainmaking Made Simple: What Every Professional Must Know

“MacInnis clearly knows his stuff…. A practical guide to thumb through before every speech, whether it’s your first or your 500th.”
USA Today

“MacInnis is a chartered accountant and is credited with inventing executive coaching in Canada. He’s given financial advice to everyone from Anne Murray to Bobby Orr. And his new book, How to Succeed at Anything by Really Trying, is all about taking the initiative. Not just really trying, but really trying hard.”
The Gazette

From the Hardcover edition.

Author Essay

The ability to effectively carry on a conversation, whether with a stranger, colleague, or friend, is an important element of success for a variety of reasons. There is no doubt that being a good conversationalist will enhance your reputation as a communicator. Furthermore, people enjoy being in the company of a good conversationalist, so it will create opportunities to expand your network of contacts. Being a good conversationalist will also make you a popular neighbour and a sought-after dinner guest. Last, and certainly not least, you will learn things.
1. Wit should be the seasoning of a conversation, never the main course.
2. The best questions in any conversation start with words that begin with w.
3. The second-best questions start with words that begin with h.
4. A good conversationalist asks the questions people want to answer.
5. One difference between a conviction and a prejudice is that a conviction can be explained without raising your voice.
6. How you say something may determine another person’s response to it; most of the friction of daily living is caused by the wrong tone of voice. There’s no need to shout if the right words are used.
7. It’s always easier to swallow angry words now than to have them shoved down your throat later.
8. What’s important to people is whatever they think is important.
9. There’s no need to talk too much about yourself; others will do that when you leave the room.
10. You may be saying all the right things but the other person may, for whatever reason, simply not be ready to hear them.

From the Hardcover edition.

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