The Magic Mountain

Hardcover $30.00

Everyman’s Library | Jun 21, 2005 | 904 Pages | 5 x 8 | ISBN 9781400044214

  • Paperback$19.00

    Vintage | Oct 01, 1996 | 720 Pages | 5-3/16 x 8 | ISBN 9780679772873

  • Hardcover$30.00

    Everyman’s Library | Jun 21, 2005 | 904 Pages | 5 x 8 | ISBN 9781400044214

Awards

Nobel Prize WINNER 1929

Praise

“All the characters in Thomas Mann’s masterpiece come considerably closer to speaking English in John E. Woods’s version . . . Woods captures perfectly the irony and humor.” –New York Times Book Review

“[Woods’s translation] succeeds in capturing the beautiful cadence of [Mann’s] ironically elegant prose.” –Washington Post Book World

“[The Magic Mountain] is one of those works that changed the shape and possibilities of European literature. It is a masterwork, unlike any other. It is also, if we learn to read it on its own terms, a delight, comic and profound, a new form of language, a new way of seeing.” –from the new Introduction by A. S. Byatt

Author Essay

In 1912 Thomas Mann’s wife, Katja, stayed in Dr Friedrich Jessen’s Waldsanatorium from March to September, suffering from a lung complaint. Mann himself visited her for four weeks in May and June. During that time, he said, he suffered a troublesome catarrh of the upper air passages, owing to the damp, cold atmosphere on the balcony. The consultant diagnosed a ‘moist spot’ of tubercular infection, just as Dr Behrens in the novel diagnoses Hans Castorp. Mann, however, did not stay in the magic mountain, but hastened back to
Flatland and Munich, where his own doctor advised him to pay no attention. There is an ironic twist to this story which would have amused the novelist ? Katja, it appears was misdiagnosed, whereas Mann himself, in his post-mortem, was indeed seen to bear the marks of an earlier tubercular illness.

Also by Thomas Mann

Biographile.com
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