Subliminal

Paperback $15.00

Vintage | Feb 12, 2013 | 272 Pages | 5-3/16 x 8 | ISBN 9780307472250

  • Paperback$15.00

    Vintage | Feb 12, 2013 | 272 Pages | 5-3/16 x 8 | ISBN 9780307472250

  • Hardcover$26.95

    Pantheon | Apr 24, 2012 | 272 Pages | 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 | ISBN 9780307378217

  • Ebook$11.99

    Vintage | Apr 24, 2012 | 272 Pages | 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 | ISBN 9780307907448

  • CD$30.00

    Random House Audio | Apr 24, 2012 | 480 Minutes | ISBN 9780739383681

  • Audiobook Download$17.50

    Random House Audio | Apr 24, 2012 | 480 Minutes | ISBN 9780739383698

Awards

PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award WINNER 2013

Praise

“With great wit and intelligence, Mlodinow takes us on a sweeping tour of this [mental] landscape and the latest revelations in neuroscience.”
    —The Huffington Post

“Mlodinow plunges into the realm of the unconscious mind accompanied by the latest scientific research . . . [with] plenty of his trademark humor.”
    —Los Angeles Times

“Clever [and] engaging. . . . A popular-science beach book, the sort of tome from which cocktail party anecdotes can be mined by the dozen.” —The Oregonian
 
“Fascinating. . . . Shows how the idea of the unconscious has become respectable again.” —The Economist
 
“A must-read book that is both provocative and hugely entertaining.” —Jerry A. Webman, chief economist, OppenheimerFunds, Inc., and author of MoneyShift

“Leonard Mlodinow never fails to make science both accessible and entertaining.”
    —Stephen Hawking, author of A Brief History of Time

“An assault against the idea that we control our decisions and our beliefs in the way that we think we do . . . . A useful addition to the growing body of work arguing convincingly against the idea of the rational human brain.”
    —The Daily Beast

“Mlodinow thinks in equations but explains in anecdote, simile, and occasional bursts of neon. . . . The results are mind-bending.”
    —Fortune

“Mlodinow argues his case persuasively and with humor.”
    —The Montreal Gazette

“In a loose, easygoing style, Mlodinow combines numerous accounts of scientific studies with pop-culture references and even personal anecdotes.”
    —Kirkus Reviews

“Mlodinow is the perfect guy to reveal the ways unrelated elements can relate and connect.”
    —The Miami Herald

“This very enlightening book explores the two sides of our mental lives, with a focus on the subconscious or subliminal element. Drawing on clinical research conducted over a period of several decades and containing a number of rather startling revelations . . . the book appeals to readers with an interest in the workings of the human mind.”
    —Booklist

“Think you know the whys and hows of your choices? Think again. Follow Mlodinow on a gorgeous journey into the enormous mental backstage behind the curtain of consciousness.” 
    —David Eagleman, neuroscientist and author of Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain

“With the same deft touch he showed in The Drunkard’s Walk, Mlodinow probes the subtle, automatic, and often unnoticed influences on our behavior.”
     —Daniel J. Simons, professor of psychology, University of Illinois, and coauthor of The Invisible Gorilla

“If you liked The Drunkard’s Walk, you’ll love Subliminal. This engaging and insightful book not only makes neuroscience understandable, it also makes it fascinating. You will look at yourself (and those around you) in a new way.”
     —Joseph T. Hallinan, author of Why We Make Mistakes

“A highly readable, funny, and thought-provoking travelogue by Mlodinow, a trusted traveler in this treacherous region, who leads us on a tour of the little-known country that is our unconscious mind.” —Christof Koch, professor of cognitive and behavioral biology, California Institute of Technology

Table Of Contents

CONTENTS
 
Prologue 

PART I: The Two-tiered Brain

1. The New Unconscious: The hidden role of our subliminal selves . . . what it means when you don’t call your mother

2. Senses Plus Mind Equals Reality: The two-tier system of the brain . . . how you can see something without knowing it

3. Remembering and Forgetting: How the brain builds memories . . . why we sometimes remember what never happened

4. The Importance of Being Social: The fundamental role of human social character . . . why Tylenol can mend a broken heart
 
Part II: The Social Unconscious

5. Reading People: How we communicate without speaking . . . how to know who’s the boss by watching her eyes

6. Judging People by Their Covers: What we read into looks, voice, and touch . . . how to win voters, attract a date, or beguile a female cowbird

7. Sorting People and Things: Why we categorize things and stereotype people . . .what Lincoln, Gandhi, and Che Guevara had in common

8. In-Groups and Out-Groups: The dynamics of us and them . . . the science behind Lord of the Flies

9. Feelings: The nature of emotions . . . why the prospect of falling hundreds of feet onto large boulders has the same effect as a flirtatious smile and a black silk nightgown

10. Self: How our ego defends its honor . . . why schedules are overly optimistic and failed CEOs feel they deserve golden parachutes

Acknowledgments

Notes

Index

Related Articles

Tastebook
Back to Top