The Amber Room

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Random House Audio | Jan 16, 2007 | 944 Minutes | ISBN 9781415939710

  • Mass Market Paperback$9.99

    Ballantine Books | Nov 27, 2007 | 464 Pages | 4-3/16 x 7-1/2 | ISBN 9780345504388

  • Ebook$9.99

    Ballantine Books | Aug 26, 2003 | ISBN 9780345469717

  • Audiobook Download$22.50

    Random House Audio | Jan 16, 2007 | 944 Minutes | ISBN 9781415939710

  • Audiobook Download$9.99

    Random House Audio | Feb 06, 2007 | 450 Minutes | ISBN 9780739354087

  • CD$19.95

    Random House Audio | Nov 27, 2007 | 450 Minutes | ISBN 9780739354070

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Praise

Praise for The Amber Room

“Sexy, illuminating, and confident. The Amber Room is my kind of thriller—a globe-trotting treasure hunt packed with exotic locales, sumptuous art, and ruthless villains. Steve Berry writes with the self-assured style of a veteran.”
—DAN BROWN
Author of The Da Vinci Code

“Magnificently engrossing, with wonderful characters and a plot that speeds, twists, and turns. Pure intrigue, pure fun.”
—CLIVE CUSSLER

“The Amber Room is a riveting cat-and-mouse game set within the world of international art thieves, assassins, and age-old rivalries. From the opening shocker set in a Nazi concentration camp to the chilling battle within a mountain-top castle, Steve Berry carries the reader on a harrowing journey into a past best left undiscovered. Not to be missed!”
—JAMES ROLLINS
Author of Amazonia and Ice Hunt

“Steve Berry has written a tremendous first novel. He weaves vivid details into a lightning quick read.”
—STEPHEN FREY
Author of Silent Partner

“Vivid, fast-moving, beautifully imagined, convincing!”
—DAVID POYER
Author of Black Storm and Fire on the Waters


From the Hardcover edition.

Author Q&A

A Conversation with Steve Berry

Question: Where did the idea for The Amber Room come from?

Steve Berry: In 1995, I was listening to a program on the Discovery channel, not watching, only listening from another room. The narrator was talking about the Amber Room. I caught only the last few minutes of the show, but the idea fascinated me. Unfortunately, not enough information came from the television show for me to even know what the Amber Room was. I actually, at first, thought it was a painting. All I learned from the little I heard was that it was stolen from the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo and had not been seen since 1945. So I went to the bookstore and thumbed through Russian travel guides until I found a reference. It took several more months of research to formulate the novel’s plot.

Q: What type of research did you do?

SB: At that time, there were precious few English version texts which dealt with the Amber Room. The Internet then contained little info, though today it’s full of relevant websites. I wrote the book with what I could find, then traveled to St. Petersburg in 1996 to see the work being done on restoring the Amber Room. The Russians had been laboring for more than a decade, trying to re-create the original from 1930s black and white photographs. After spending two hours with the chief restorer I realized a lot of the details I’d written were wrong. So I rewrote the book and fixed everything.


Q: What is the Amber Room?

SB: Created in the mid-18th century, many say it was the greatest achievement man ever accomplished with amber. The room was 100,000 pieces of jewel grade amber, cut to 5 mm thick, polished, sometimes heated to change the color, then glued jigsaw-puzzle-style onto oak panels and fashioned to walls 30 x 13 feet. There were also a variety of fanciful figurines, floral garlands, tulips, roses, sea shells, monogrammes, and rocaille, all of amber in glittering shades of brown, red, yellow, and orange. Incredibly, the amber panels survived a 170 years and the Bolshevik Revolution intact only to be looted by the Nazis in 1941. The panels disappeared in 1945 and have never been seen since. That, in and of itself, is fascinating. Where did such an incredible treasure go?


Q: What about your main characters?

SB: My protagonists are often lawyers, but they are lawyers doing some very unlawyerly things. I want them thrown into difficult situations for which they are ill prepared – but over which, in the end, they prevail. In The Amber Room, my protagonists are a female judge and her ex-husband, who is a probate lawyer. They are divorced from each other and, along the way to finding the Amber Room, they discover things not only about each other but about themselves. I also like to break stereotypes. The Amber Room has a potent male ensemble, but there are also two strong female characters who play an intricate role in the plot. So there’s a human angle to this globe-trotting treasure hunt.


Q: And how about accuracy, is the information in the book true?

SB: Most of the information contained within The Amber Room is true. I try to educate while entertaining. Readers can consult the Writer’s Note at the end of the book, which delineates where liberties were taken.


Q: How did the book make it into print?

SB: I first wrote the novel in 1995. It was submitted for publication in 1997 and was rejected by eighteen major publishers. The manuscript sat in a folder until February 2002 when I asked my agent if she would resubmit it. Usually, resubmission is a no-no, but she agreed and Ballantine Books bought the story in May 2002. Which only goes to show: never give up.


From the Paperback edition.

 

A Conversation with Steve Berry

Question: Where did the idea for The Amber Room come from?

Steve Berry: In 1995, I was listening to a program on the Discovery channel, not watching, only listening from another room. The narrator was talking about the Amber Room. I caught only the last few minutes of the show, but the idea fascinated me. Unfortunately, not enough information came from the television show for me to even know what the Amber Room was. I actually, at first, thought it was a painting. All I learned from the little I heard was that it was stolen from the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo and had not been seen since 1945. So I went to the bookstore and thumbed through Russian travel guides until I found a reference. It took several more months of research to formulate the novel’s plot.

Q: What type of research did you do?

SB: At that time, there were precious few English version texts which dealt with the Amber Room. The Internet then contained little info, though today it’s full of relevant websites. I wrote the book with what I could find, then traveled to St. Petersburg in 1996 to see the work being done on restoring the Amber Room. The Russians had been laboring for more than a decade, trying to re-create the original from 1930s black and white photographs. After spending two hours with the chief restorer I realized a lot of the details I’d written were wrong. So I rewrote the book and fixed everything.


Q: What is the Amber Room?

SB: Created in the mid-18th century, many say it was the greatest achievement man ever accomplished with amber. The room was 100,000 pieces of jewel grade amber, cut to 5 mm thick, polished, sometimes heated to change the color, then glued jigsaw-puzzle-style onto oak panels and fashioned to walls 30 x 13 feet. There were also a variety of fanciful figurines, floral garlands, tulips, roses, sea shells, monogrammes, and rocaille, all of amber in glittering shades of brown, red, yellow, and orange. Incredibly, the amber panels survived a 170 years and the Bolshevik Revolution intact only to be looted by the Nazis in 1941. The panels disappeared in 1945 and have never been seen since. That, in and of itself, is fascinating. Where did such an incredible treasure go?


Q: What about your main characters?

SB: My protagonists are often lawyers, but they are lawyers doing some very unlawyerly things. I want them thrown into difficult situations for which they are ill prepared – but over which, in the end, they prevail. In The Amber Room, my protagonists are a female judge and her ex-husband, who is a probate lawyer. They are divorced from each other and, along the way to finding the Amber Room, they discover things not only about each other but about themselves. I also like to break stereotypes. The Amber Room has a potent male ensemble, but there are also two strong female characters who play an intricate role in the plot. So there’s a human angle to this globe-trotting treasure hunt.


Q: And how about accuracy, is the information in the book true?

SB: Most of the information contained within The Amber Room is true. I try to educate while entertaining. Readers can consult the Writer’s Note at the end of the book, which delineates where liberties were taken.


Q: How did the book make it into print?

SB: I first wrote the novel in 1995. It was submitted for publication in 1997 and was rejected by eighteen major publishers. The manuscript sat in a folder until February 2002 when I asked my agent if she would resubmit it. Usually, resubmission is a no-no, but she agreed and Ballantine Books bought the story in May 2002. Which only goes to show: never give up.


From the Paperback edition.

 

A Conversation with Steve Berry

Question: Where did the idea for The Amber Room come from?

Steve Berry: In 1995, I was listening to a program on the Discovery channel, not watching, only listening from another room. The narrator was talking about the Amber Room. I caught only the last few minutes of the show, but the idea fascinated me. Unfortunately, not enough information came from the television show for me to even know what the Amber Room was. I actually, at first, thought it was a painting. All I learned from the little I heard was that it was stolen from the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo and had not been seen since 1945. So I went to the bookstore and thumbed through Russian travel guides until I found a reference. It took several more months of research to formulate the novel’s plot.

Q: What type of research did you do?

SB: At that time, there were precious few English version texts which dealt with the Amber Room. The Internet then contained little info, though today it’s full of relevant websites. I wrote the book with what I could find, then traveled to St. Petersburg in 1996 to see the work being done on restoring the Amber Room. The Russians had been laboring for more than a decade, trying to re-create the original from 1930s black and white photographs. After spending two hours with the chief restorer I realized a lot of the details I’d written were wrong. So I rewrote the book and fixed everything.


Q: What is the Amber Room?

SB: Created in the mid-18th century, many say it was the greatest achievement man ever accomplished with amber. The room was 100,000 pieces of jewel grade amber, cut to 5 mm thick, polished, sometimes heated to change the color, then glued jigsaw-puzzle-style onto oak panels and fashioned to walls 30 x 13 feet. There were also a variety of fanciful figurines, floral garlands, tulips, roses, sea shells, monogrammes, and rocaille, all of amber in glittering shades of brown, red, yellow, and orange. Incredibly, the amber panels survived a 170 years and the Bolshevik Revolution intact only to be looted by the Nazis in 1941. The panels disappeared in 1945 and have never been seen since. That, in and of itself, is fascinating. Where did such an incredible treasure go?


Q: What about your main characters?

SB: My protagonists are often lawyers, but they are lawyers doing some very unlawyerly things. I want them thrown into difficult situations for which they are ill prepared – but over which, in the end, they prevail. In The Amber Room, my protagonists are a female judge and her ex-husband, who is a probate lawyer. They are divorced from each other and, along the way to finding the Amber Room, they discover things not only about each other but about themselves. I also like to break stereotypes. The Amber Room has a potent male ensemble, but there are also two strong female characters who play an intricate role in the plot. So there’s a human angle to this globe-trotting treasure hunt.


Q: And how about accuracy, is the information in the book true?

SB: Most of the information contained within The Amber Room is true. I try to educate while entertaining. Readers can consult the Writer’s Note at the end of the book, which delineates where liberties were taken.


Q: How did the book make it into print?

SB: I first wrote the novel in 1995. It was submitted for publication in 1997 and was rejected by eighteen major publishers. The manuscript sat in a folder until February 2002 when I asked my agent if she would resubmit it. Usually, resubmission is a no-no, but she agreed and Ballantine Books bought the story in May 2002. Which only goes to show: never give up.

 

A Conversation with Steve Berry

Question: Where did the idea for The Amber Room come from?

Steve Berry: In 1995, I was listening to a program on the Discovery channel, not watching, only listening from another room. The narrator was talking about the Amber Room. I caught only the last few minutes of the show, but the idea fascinated me. Unfortunately, not enough information came from the television show for me to even know what the Amber Room was. I actually, at first, thought it was a painting. All I learned from the little I heard was that it was stolen from the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo and had not been seen since 1945. So I went to the bookstore and thumbed through Russian travel guides until I found a reference. It took several more months of research to formulate the novel’s plot.

Q: What type of research did you do?

SB: At that time, there were precious few English version texts which dealt with the Amber Room. The Internet then contained little info, though today it’s full of relevant websites. I wrote the book with what I could find, then traveled to St. Petersburg in 1996 to see the work being done on restoring the Amber Room. The Russians had been laboring for more than a decade, trying to re-create the original from 1930s black and white photographs. After spending two hours with the chief restorer I realized a lot of the details I’d written were wrong. So I rewrote the book and fixed everything.


Q: What is the Amber Room?

SB: Created in the mid-18th century, many say it was the greatest achievement man ever accomplished with amber. The room was 100,000 pieces of jewel grade amber, cut to 5 mm thick, polished, sometimes heated to change the color, then glued jigsaw-puzzle-style onto oak panels and fashioned to walls 30 x 13 feet. There were also a variety of fanciful figurines, floral garlands, tulips, roses, sea shells, monogrammes, and rocaille, all of amber in glittering shades of brown, red, yellow, and orange. Incredibly, the amber panels survived a 170 years and the Bolshevik Revolution intact only to be looted by the Nazis in 1941. The panels disappeared in 1945 and have never been seen since. That, in and of itself, is fascinating. Where did such an incredible treasure go?


Q: What about your main characters?

SB: My protagonists are often lawyers, but they are lawyers doing some very unlawyerly things. I want them thrown into difficult situations for which they are ill prepared – but over which, in the end, they prevail. In The Amber Room, my protagonists are a female judge and her ex-husband, who is a probate lawyer. They are divorced from each other and, along the way to finding the Amber Room, they discover things not only about each other but about themselves. I also like to break stereotypes. The Amber Room has a potent male ensemble, but there are also two strong female characters who play an intricate role in the plot. So there’s a human angle to this globe-trotting treasure hunt.


Q: And how about accuracy, is the information in the book true?

SB: Most of the information contained within The Amber Room is true. I try to educate while entertaining. Readers can consult the Writer’s Note at the end of the book, which delineates where liberties were taken.


Q: How did the book make it into print?

SB: I first wrote the novel in 1995. It was submitted for publication in 1997 and was rejected by eighteen major publishers. The manuscript sat in a folder until February 2002 when I asked my agent if she would resubmit it. Usually, resubmission is a no-no, but she agreed and Ballantine Books bought the story in May 2002. Which only goes to show: never give up.


From the Paperback edition.

 

A Conversation with Steve Berry

Question: Where did the idea for The Amber Room come from?

Steve Berry: In 1995, I was listening to a program on the Discovery channel, not watching, only listening from another room. The narrator was talking about the Amber Room. I caught only the last few minutes of the show, but the idea fascinated me. Unfortunately, not enough information came from the television show for me to even know what the Amber Room was. I actually, at first, thought it was a painting. All I learned from the little I heard was that it was stolen from the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo and had not been seen since 1945. So I went to the bookstore and thumbed through Russian travel guides until I found a reference. It took several more months of research to formulate the novel’s plot.

Q: What type of research did you do?

SB: At that time, there were precious few English version texts which dealt with the Amber Room. The Internet then contained little info, though today it’s full of relevant websites. I wrote the book with what I could find, then traveled to St. Petersburg in 1996 to see the work being done on restoring the Amber Room. The Russians had been laboring for more than a decade, trying to re-create the original from 1930s black and white photographs. After spending two hours with the chief restorer I realized a lot of the details I’d written were wrong. So I rewrote the book and fixed everything.


Q: What is the Amber Room?

SB: Created in the mid-18th century, many say it was the greatest achievement man ever accomplished with amber. The room was 100,000 pieces of jewel grade amber, cut to 5 mm thick, polished, sometimes heated to change the color, then glued jigsaw-puzzle-style onto oak panels and fashioned to walls 30 x 13 feet. There were also a variety of fanciful figurines, floral garlands, tulips, roses, sea shells, monogrammes, and rocaille, all of amber in glittering shades of brown, red, yellow, and orange. Incredibly, the amber panels survived a 170 years and the Bolshevik Revolution intact only to be looted by the Nazis in 1941. The panels disappeared in 1945 and have never been seen since. That, in and of itself, is fascinating. Where did such an incredible treasure go?


Q: What about your main characters?

SB: My protagonists are often lawyers, but they are lawyers doing some very unlawyerly things. I want them thrown into difficult situations for which they are ill prepared – but over which, in the end, they prevail. In The Amber Room, my protagonists are a female judge and her ex-husband, who is a probate lawyer. They are divorced from each other and, along the way to finding the Amber Room, they discover things not only about each other but about themselves. I also like to break stereotypes. The Amber Room has a potent male ensemble, but there are also two strong female characters who play an intricate role in the plot. So there’s a human angle to this globe-trotting treasure hunt.


Q: And how about accuracy, is the information in the book true?

SB: Most of the information contained within The Amber Room is true. I try to educate while entertaining. Readers can consult the Writer’s Note at the end of the book, which delineates where liberties were taken.


Q: How did the book make it into print?

SB: I first wrote the novel in 1995. It was submitted for publication in 1997 and was rejected by eighteen major publishers. The manuscript sat in a folder until February 2002 when I asked my agent if she would resubmit it. Usually, resubmission is a no-no, but she agreed and Ballantine Books bought the story in May 2002. Which only goes to show: never give up.


From the Paperback edition.

Also by Steve Berry

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