The Baby’s Table

Paperback $22.95

Random House Canada | Mar 30, 2010 | 240 Pages | 6 x 8-7/8 | ISBN 9780307358837

  • Paperback$22.95

    Random House Canada | Mar 30, 2010 | 240 Pages | 6 x 8-7/8 | ISBN 9780307358837

  • Ebook$17.99

    Random House Canada | Mar 30, 2010 | 240 Pages | ISBN 9780307358844

Praise

“A must for new parents – this book contains a wealth of medical and nutritional information for feeding your baby.”
— Anne Lindsay
 
“With so many food choices available, many parents become confused about when, how, and what to feed their babies. This book goes a long way toward helping make their choices (and their lives) easier.”
— Dr. Richard B. Goldbloom, Professor of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University

“Finally! A book that I will be happy to recommend to my patients.”
— Dr. Cheryl Mutch, pediatrician

Table Of Contents

Foreword
Introduction

Newborn to Four Months
From Four Months
From Six Months
From Eight Months
Toddlers

Appendix I: Resources
Appendix II: Growth Charts
Appendix III: References
Recipe Index
General Index

Author Essay

Although juice is a source of vitamin C, your baby does not need it and there is no nutritional reason to give it to an infant before the age of one. This is due in part to the fact that the Recommended Nutrient Intake for vitamin C for infants (6 to 12 months) is 20 mg per day and this amount is easily obtained by drinking breast milk or infant formula and eating vegetables and fruit.
 
The problem with juice is that it is all too common to consume too much of it and this can indirectly contribute to inadequate intake of other nutrients. Furthermore, the sorbitol and fructose content of juice can cause diarrhea, poor weight gain and failure to thrive. Excessive juice intake can also lead to dental caries. If offering juice, only serve 100 percent real fruit juice and limit it to 60 to 125 ml (1/4 to 1/2 cup) per day. Serve it in a cup and don’t dilute it with water. With diluting comes the tendency to serve it more frequently, which only serves to continually bathe the teeth in plaque-forming bacteria.



CALCIUM CRUNCH
By Brenda Bradshaw and Lauren Donaldson Bramley, M.D., authors of The Baby’s Table
 
1 potato, washed and baked
1/3 bunch broccoli, washed and cut in florets
4 bunches baby bok choy, outer layers removed, trimmed and washed between leaves
• Peel potato and cut in chunks.
• In steamer, cook broccoli over boiling water until tender, about 15 minutes. Remove broccoli.
Place bok choy in steamer; steam until tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Set aside leftover cooking water.
• Place vegetables in food processor and purée until smooth. If purée seems too thick, add left -
over cooking water as needed, 1 tbsp at a time.
• Pour into ice cube trays and freeze.
Yield: 14 to 16 cubes


VEGETABLE TRIO
By Brenda Bradshaw and Lauren Donaldson Bramley, M.D., authors of The Baby’s Table
 
1 potato, washed, peeled and cut in cubes
1 carrot, washed, peeled and sliced
1/4 bunch broccoli, washed and cut in florets
1/4 cup leftover cooking water (optional)
• In saucepan of boiling water, cook potato until tender, about 20 minutes.
• In steamer, steam remaining vegetables until tender, about 15 minutes.
• In blender or food processor, purée vegetables, adding stock (if needed) to achieve desired consistency.
• Pour into ice cube trays and freeze.
Yield: 12 to 14 cubes


From the Trade Paperback edition.

 

Although juice is a source of vitamin C, your baby does not need it and there is no nutritional reason to give it to an infant before the age of one. This is due in part to the fact that the Recommended Nutrient Intake for vitamin C for infants (6 to 12 months) is 20 mg per day and this amount is easily obtained by drinking breast milk or infant formula and eating vegetables and fruit.
 
The problem with juice is that it is all too common to consume too much of it and this can indirectly contribute to inadequate intake of other nutrients. Furthermore, the sorbitol and fructose content of juice can cause diarrhea, poor weight gain and failure to thrive. Excessive juice intake can also lead to dental caries. If offering juice, only serve 100 percent real fruit juice and limit it to 60 to 125 ml (1/4 to 1/2 cup) per day. Serve it in a cup and don’t dilute it with water. With diluting comes the tendency to serve it more frequently, which only serves to continually bathe the teeth in plaque-forming bacteria.



CALCIUM CRUNCH
By Brenda Bradshaw and Lauren Donaldson Bramley, M.D., authors of The Baby’s Table
 
1 potato, washed and baked
1/3 bunch broccoli, washed and cut in florets
4 bunches baby bok choy, outer layers removed, trimmed and washed between leaves
• Peel potato and cut in chunks.
• In steamer, cook broccoli over boiling water until tender, about 15 minutes. Remove broccoli.
Place bok choy in steamer; steam until tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Set aside leftover cooking water.
• Place vegetables in food processor and purée until smooth. If purée seems too thick, add left -
over cooking water as needed, 1 tbsp at a time.
• Pour into ice cube trays and freeze.
Yield: 14 to 16 cubes


VEGETABLE TRIO
By Brenda Bradshaw and Lauren Donaldson Bramley, M.D., authors of The Baby’s Table
 
1 potato, washed, peeled and cut in cubes
1 carrot, washed, peeled and sliced
1/4 bunch broccoli, washed and cut in florets
1/4 cup leftover cooking water (optional)
• In saucepan of boiling water, cook potato until tender, about 20 minutes.
• In steamer, steam remaining vegetables until tender, about 15 minutes.
• In blender or food processor, purée vegetables, adding stock (if needed) to achieve desired consistency.
• Pour into ice cube trays and freeze.
Yield: 12 to 14 cubes

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