The Murder of the Century

Ebook $11.99

Broadway Books | Jun 14, 2011 | ISBN 9780307592224

  • Paperback$16.00

    Broadway Books | Apr 24, 2012 | 336 Pages | 5-3/16 x 8 | ISBN 9780307592217

  • Ebook$11.99

    Broadway Books | Jun 14, 2011 | ISBN 9780307592224

Praise

“[Collins’] exploration of the newspaper world, at the very moment when tabloid values were being born, is revealing but also enormously entertaining….Collins has a clear eye, a good sense of telling detail, and a fine narrative ability.” Wall Street Journal

“Riveting….Collins has mined enough newspaper clippings and other archives to artfully recreate the era, the crime and the newspaper wars it touched off.” New York Times

“[A] richly detailed book that reads like a novel and yet maintains a strict fidelity to facts. THE MURDER OF THE CENTURY isn’t a case of history with a moral. It’s simply a fantastic, factual yarn, and a reminder that abhorrent violence is nothing new under the sun.” Oregonian

“A wonderful reminder that we have often been just as we are: fools for spectacle, short of memory, cheered by the invigorating shock of the immoral.” Willamette Week

“Paul Collins’ account of the headless torso murder that led to an all-out newspaper war and then a dramatic trial has all the timeless elements of a great yarn–a baffling mystery, intriguing suspects, and flawed detectives. It’s compelling history that’s also great page-turning entertainment.” —Howard Blum, author of The Floor of Heaven and American Lightning

“Wonderfully rich in period detail, salacious facts about the case and infectious wonder at the chutzpah and inventiveness displayed by Pulitzer’s and Hearst’s minions. Both a gripping true-crime narrative and an astonishing portrait of fin de siecle yellow journalism.” Kirkus Reviews

“A dismembered corpse and rival newspapers squabbling for headlines fuel Collins’s intriguing look at the birth of “yellow journalism” in late–19th-century New York.  an in-depth account of the exponential growth of lurid news and the public’s (continuing) insatiable appetite for it.” Publishers Weekly


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