Pok Pok

Hardcover $35.00

Oct 29, 2013 | 304 Pages

Ebook $18.99

Oct 29, 2013 | 272 Pages

  • Hardcover $35.00

    Oct 29, 2013 | 304 Pages

  • Ebook $18.99

    Oct 29, 2013 | 272 Pages

Praise

“In this groundbreaking masterwork, Andy Ricker weaves together superb recipes, enlightening cultural narratives, meaningful personal essays, and an incomparable insight into the essence of Thai foodways. But perhaps this book’s greatest achievement is the honest, uncompromising way it brings real Thai cookery right into American readers’ homes. The bar has been set for ethnic cookbooks going forward.”
—Andrew Zimmern

“Everything I know about Thai food I learned from Andy Ricker—how to order it, how to eat it, and now, how to cook it. Pok Pok is destined to be the Thai bible for every adventurous home cook. Part memoir, part cooking manifesto, it beautifully and passionately shows Ricker’s no-nonsense approach to one of the world’s most exciting cuisines. When my daughters ask why they grew up eating so much khao soi kai, papaya salad, and laap pet isaan at home, I’ll tell them they have Andy Ricker—and this book—to thank.
—Andrew Knowlton, restaurant and drink editor, Bon Appétit
 
“More than a Thai cookbook or even a regional Thai cookbook, this is a book about people: the street and market vendors, home cooks, and restaurant owners who Andy Ricker has met and studied with for over two decades in Thailand. In Pok  Pok, Andy shares their stories, skills, and ideas—and his own passion for discovering a cuisine by going door to door. Oh yeah, and he makes some insanely delicious food along the way.”
—Francis Lam, writer and judge on Top Chef Masters
 
“You’d be hard-pressed to find better Thai food than what Andy Ricker is serving at Pok Pok. And now, with his cookbook, we finally get to see the people, places, and experiences that were the inspiration for it all.”
—David Chang, chef/owner of Momofuku 

“This book, as far as I’m concerned, is an argument ender. When Andy says ‘make som tam lao like this,’ it’s like Jacques Pépin telling you how to make an omelette.  The matter is settled. Previously, I would never have even attempted to prepare most of these dishes in my home. I had always felt that Thai food was best left to the experts. But this book has given me hope and confidence.”
—Anthony Bourdain

“In his introduction, Ricker makes the modest proclamation that his cooking knowledge is limited when measured against Thailand’s vast cuisine. However, this limitation has had no visible effect on his success, given that his eatery, Pok Pok, was recently rated by Bon Appétit as the eighth most important American restaurant. All one really needs to know about Ricker, and this finely detailed cookbook and travelogue, comes at the start of his recipe for fish-sauce wings. Sounding like a gourmand Allen Ginsberg, he writes, “I’ve spent the better part of the last twenty years roaming around Thailand, cooking and recooking strange soups, beseeching street vendors for stir-fry tips, and trying to figure out how to reproduce obscure Thai products with American ingredients.” He spills out his acquired knowledge here across 13 chapters and nearly 100 recipes. Lessons learned along the way include the beauty of blandness as exhibited in his flavor-balanced “bland soup” with glass noodles, and waste not, want not, as showcased in recipes for stewed pork knuckles and grilled pork neck. Ricker’s prose, as aided by food writer Goode, is captivating, whether he is discussing America’s obsession with sateh, or when profiling characters he’s encountered in his travels, such as Mr. Lit, his “chicken mentor” and Sunny, his “go-to guy in Chiang Mai.”
Publisher’s Weekly Starred Review

Table Of Contents

Foreword by David Thompson  
Introduction
How to Use This Book 
Ingredients 
Mail-Order Sources 
Thai Regional Rundown 
the MortaR and Pestle 
 
 
CHAPTER 1 Khao (Rice) 
The Absurdity of Authenticity 
Khao Hom Mali (Jasmine rice) 
Khao Niaw (Sticky rice)

CHAPTER 2 Som Tam   (Papaya salad and family) 
Som Tam Thai  (Central Thai–style papaya salad) 
Som Tam Lao (Lao/Isaan-style papaya salad) 
Som Tam Phonlamai (Thai fruit  salad) 
Tam Taeng Kwaa  (Thai cucumber salad) 

CHAPTER 3 Yam (Thai “salads”) 
Yam Khai Dao (Fried egg salad) 
Yam Tuna (Thai tuna salad) 
Yam Wun Sen “Chao Wang”  (Sunny’s fancy glass noodle salad) 
Yam Makheua Yao  (Grilled eggplant salad) 
Sunny 
Yam Samun Phrai (Northern Thai–style herbal salad) 
Neua Naam Tok  (Isaan steak salad) 
Het Paa Naam Tok (Isaan-style forest mushroom salad) 

CHAPTER 4 Plaa (Fish)  
Plaa Neung Manao (Steamed whole fish with lime and chiles) 
Plaa Neung Si Ew  (Steamed whole fish with soy sauce, ginger, and vegetables) 
Plaa Phao Kleua (Grilled salt-crusted fish with chile dipping sauce) 
Plaa Thawt Lat Phrik (Deep-fried whole fish with chile sauce)
Aep Plaa (Curried fish grilled in  banana leaves) 
 
CHAPTER 5 Phat (Stir-fries) 
Phat Khanaeng  (Stir-fried Brussels sprouts) 
Phat Fak Thawng (Northern Thai–style stir-fried squash) 
Phak Buung Fai Daeng (Stir-fried water spinach) 
Phat Phak Ruam Mit  (Stir-fried mixed vegetables) 
Puu Phat Phong Karii (Crab stir-fried with curry powder) 

CHAPTER 6 Laap   (Thai minced-meat salads) 
Laap Meuang (Northern Thai minced pork salad) 
Da Chom 
Laap Pet Isaan  (Isaan minced duck salad) 
Laap Plaa Duuk Isaan  (Isaan minced catfish salad) 

CHAPTER 7 Khong Yaang   (Grilled foods)  
Muu Kham Waan  (Grilled pork neck with spicy dipping sauce and iced greens)
Sii Khrong Muu Yaang  (Thai-style pork ribs) 
Sai Ua Samun Phrai (Northern  Thai–style herbal sausage) 
Kai Yaang  (Whole roasted young chicken) 
Mr. Lit 
Muu Sateh (Pork satay) 
Khao Phot Ping (Grilled corn with  salty coconut cream) 

CHAPTER 8 Kaeng, Tom, & Co.   (Curries and soups)  
Kaeng Jeut Wun Sen  (“Bland” soup with glass noodles) 
Jaw Phak Kat  (Northern Thai mustard green soup with tamarind and pork ribs) 
Jin Hoom Neua  (Northern Thai stewed beef soup) 
Yam Jin Kai  (Northern Thai chicken soup) 
Kaeng Khiaw Waan Luuk Chin Plaa (Green curry with fish balls and  eggplant) 
Kaeng Som Kung  (Sour curry with shrimp) 
Kaeng Khanun (Northern Thai  young jackfruit curry) 
Kaeng Hung Leh  (Burmese-style pork belly curry) 

CHAPTER 9 Naam Phrik (Chile dips)  
Naam Phrik Num (Green chile dip) 
Naam Phrik Plaa Thuu  (Grilled-fish dip) 
Naam Phrik Ong (Northern Thai pork and tomato dip) 
Naam Phrik Kha  (Dry-fried galangal-chile dip) 

CHAPTER 10 Aahaan Jaan Diaw   (The one-plate meal)  
Khao Kha Muu (Pork shank stewed with five spice) 
Kai Kaphrao Khai Dao  (Stir-fried chicken with hot basil) 
Khao Phat Muu  (Thai-style fried rice with pork) 
Khao Man Som Tam (Papaya salad with coconut rice and sweet pork) 
Khao Tom (Thai rice soup) 
Kuaytiaw Pet Tuun  (Stewed duck noodle soup) 
Kuaytiaw Reua (Boat noodles) 
Ba Mii Tom Yam Muu Haeng  (Spicy, sweet, tart noodles with pork, peanuts, and herbs)
Kung Op Wun Sen  (Shrimp and glass noodles baked in a clay pot)  
Khao Soi Kai (Northern Thai curry noodle soup with chicken) 
Phat Si Ew  (Stir-fried rice noodles with pork, Chinese broccoli, and soy sauce)
Phat Thai (Stir-fried rice noodles with shrimp, tofu, and peanuts) 
Hoi Thawt  (Broken crepe with mussels) 
Kuaytiaw Khua Kai (Stir-fried noodles with chicken, egg, and cuttlefish on lettuce) 
Khanom Jiin Naam Yaa (Thai rice noodles  with fish-and-krachai curry) 
Khanom Jiin Naam Ngiew  (Thai rice noodles with Northern Thai curry)
Ajaan Sunee 
Phat Khanom Jiin  (Stir-fried Thai rice noodles) 

CHAPTER 11 Aahaan Farang   (Foreign food)  
Stir-Fried Yunnan Ham with  Chiles 
Cha cá Lã Vºng  (Vietnamese turmeric-marinated  catfish with noodles and herbs) 
Ike’s Vietnamese Fish-Sauce  Wings 

CHAPTER 12 Khong Waan (Sweets) 
Khanom Bataeng Laai  (Northern Thai melon custard) 
Khao Niaw Mamuang  (Sticky rice with mango and salty-sweet coconut cream) 
Khao Niaw Sankhaya Turian  (Sticky rice with durian custard) 
Khanom Pang Ai Tiim (Thai-style ice cream sandwich) 
Pok Pok Affogato 

CHAPTER 13 Sundry Items   (Stock, Condiments, and   Pantry Staples)  
Sup Kraduuk Muu (Pork stock) 
Muu Deng (Bouncy pork balls)
Khai Tom (Eight-minute eggs) 
Phrik Phon Khua  (Toasted-chile powder) 
Khao Khua  (Toasted–sticky rice powder) 
Krathiem Jiaw and  Naam Man Krathiem  (Fried garlic and garlic oil) 
Hom Daeng Jiaw and  Naam Man Hom Daeng  (Fried shallots and shallot oil) 
Kapi Kung  (Homemade shrimp paste) 
Naam Makham (Tamarind water) 
Naam Cheuam Naam Taan Piip  (Palm sugar simple syrup) 
Naam Jim Kai (Sweet chile dipping sauce) 
Naam Jim Kai Yaang  (Tamarind dipping sauce) 
Jaew (Spicy, tart dipping sauce  for meat) 
Phrik Naam Som  (Sour chile dipping sauce) 
Naam Jim Seafood (Spicy, tart dipping sauce for seafood) 
Naam Jim Sateh (Peanut sauce) 
Yam Makheua Thet  (Fish sauce–soaked tomatoes) 
Ajaat (Cucumber relish) 
Cu Cai  (Pickled carrot and daikon radish) 
Phrik Tam Naam Som  (Grilled-chile vinegar) 
Phrik Naam Plaa (Fish sauce–soaked chiles) 
Phrik Naam Som  (Vinegar-soaked chiles)
Naam Phrik Phao  (Roasted chile paste) 
 
 
 
Acknowledgments 
Index

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