Old Buildings, New Forms

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Old Buildings, New Forms by Francoise Bollack
Hardcover $50.00

Nov 12, 2013 | 224 Pages

  • Hardcover $50.00

    Nov 12, 2013 | 224 Pages


“The author’s introduction is both elegant and illuminating, as are the introductory notes to each of the five types. Bollack’s book opens readers to the ‘creative possibilities of preservation.’ It gives us a vivid reminder that we can embrace modernity while respecting the past.” —Architectural Record

“Hidden behind the shiny sight of bold new buildings lies a rather quieter architectural story, that of renovation, restoration and re-use. Old Buildings, New Forms is a survey of the very best in rebuilding, with nearly 30 projects from around the world.” —Wallpaper
“Full of some great examples of how old buildings are not static set pieces; they are canvases for the continuing evolution of places and the lives within them. One of the most convincing aspects of the book can be found in the introduction to each chapter. There, Bollack presents historical precedents that lend credence to the handful of techniques she highlights, while also adding weight to the idea that transformations are necessary and welcoming.” —Archidose

“‘Like most architecture students, I was taught that new was better, somehow more courageous, more moral,’ reflects architect Françoise Astorg Bollack in her new book. But the buildings presented in her compilation incorporate old structures. From Alsop Architects’ Sharp Center for Design in Toronto, a pixilated metal box-like canopy dominating the entrance, to Ibos & Vitart Architects’ expansion of Le Museé des Beaux-Arts in Lille, each of the 29 projects displays modern interventions on historic buildings. Copious text and floor plans accompany beautiful photography.” —Interior Design 

“How can one reconcile a love of old buildings with a modern architectural practice? Bollack, who runs a thriving New York firm and teaches in the Historic Preservation Program at Columbia University, finds that many peers have made successful ‘interventions’ with older buildings which she categorises into five types: insertions, parasites, wraps, juxtapositions and weavings. The terms are intuitive, but Bollack expands on them verbally and visually in an interesting and even absorbing way. Bollack’s passion for architecture in all of its varied manifestations is clear. This passion makes Old Buildings, New Forms a stimulating verbal and visual treat that will inform and enhance how one looks at such interventions.” —C20 Magazine

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