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Finding Manana

Paperback $17.00

Apr 04, 2006 | 320 Pages

  • Paperback $17.00

    Apr 04, 2006 | 320 Pages

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Praise

“It’s impossible not to admire the boldness, the candor, the moral toughness of Ms. Ojito’s writing. In this wonderful memoir, she ransoms herself from the seductions of nostalgia, and reclaims instead the beleaguered Cuba of her childhood—a Cuba that is all the more interesting for not being looked at through the prism of longing and desire.”The New York Times
 
“In Finding Mañana, Mirta Ojito goes a long way in righting the Mariel story and bestowing some belated dignity on this ragged stepchild of exile history.”—The Los Angeles Times
 
“Ms. Ojito’s book is filled with the anguish of separation and the tragedy of living under a merciless regime. But it also celebrates familial bonds and undying love—not to mention freedom itself, a gift too often taken for granted by those of us who have never had to live without it.”—The Wall Street Journal
 
“The insight Ojito brings to bear, coupled with the crispness if her prose…make this memoir required reading for anyone interested in the history of post-Batista Cuba or Cuban-American relations.”—The Washington Post
 
New York Times reporter Mirta Ojito melds the personal with the political in a moving account of her family’s departure from Cuba. She also provides a solid historical context for those five months in 1980 when 125,000 Cubans arrived in Florida, a mass exodus that came to be known as the Mariel boat lift.”—People 
 
“Ojito’s historical reconstruction is fascinating… (She) has created a poignant and poetic memoir of an important moment in Cuban and US history.”The Washington Times
 
“…this is much more than one Cuban exile’s bittersweet tale; it’s the memoir of an entire era.” Times-Picayune
 
“Ojito’s book…is unlike most entries in the genre of the modern memoir. More than a novelistic exercise in creative recollection, it’s a skillful blend of reportage and family history about a pivotal international event.”Sun-Sentinel
 
“Like many Cuban exiles, Ojito says she left part of her soul in Cuba. The good news is the rest of it came over with her intact. Plenty of it went into this book.”St. Petersburg Times
 

“… a political drama … bound to be a page-turner.”—Palm Beach Post 
 
“A thorough and exciting account…a suspenseful story…A skillful melding of individual personalities with the grand currents of history.”—Kirkus Reviews
 
“…fast-paced and riveting…Ojito uses her formidable research, eye for detail and interviewing skills to lay bare the behind-the-scenes machinations…through her writing, she has opened a window for others, and offers a fine introduction to the human face of history.”Bookpage
 
“…a rich, but nuanced picture of life in Cuba under Castro and the intimately personal nature of politics.”Library Journal

“Until I read this book, the Mariel refugees were headlines in a newspaper, stereotypes fed by political rhetoric. In Finding Mañana, Mirta Ojito has given me a peek behind the headlines, and a sense of how history affects the individual.” —Esmeralda Santiago, author of When I was Puerto Rican
 
Finding Mañana is a strongly written, straight-shooting and affecting memoir about one family’s experiences leading up to the Mariel boatlift out of Cuba.  Rich in detail and concise in its capturing of that chapter of Cuban history, the book is also a touching tale of a young woman’s coming of age during a time of great political turmoil and personal travails.”—Oscar Hijuelos, author of The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love

Table Of Contents

Prologue

One: Worms Like Us

Two: Bernaro Benes: Our Man in Miami

Three: Butterlfies

Four: Héctor Sanyustiz: A Way Out

Five: Ernesto Pinto: An Embassy Under Siege

Six: Unwanted

Seven: Napoleón Vilaboa: The Golden Door

Eight: Leaving Cuba

Nine: Captain Mike Howell: Sailing Mañana

Ten: Tempest-Tost

Eleven: Teeming Shore

Twelve: With Open Arms

Epilogue
Acknowledgments
Notes
Index

Product Details

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