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Closer Than You Think

  • Ebook $7.99

    Feb 03, 2015 | 688 Pages

Product Details

Praise

Praise for Karen Rose and her novels:

“An excellent example of how far-reaching and varied romance can be. The plot is complex, the characterization sound and the boundaries of the genre pushed… tremendously sexy.”—The New York Times

“Karen Rose delivers the kind of high-wire suspense that keeps you riveted.”—Lisa Gardner

“Karen Rose writes blistering, high-octane suspense that never lets up.”—Karen Robards

“From the first rousing chapter to the last…intense, complex, and unforgettable.”—James Patterson

“A high-octane thrill ride that kept me on the edge of my seat and up far too late at night!”—Lisa Jackson

“Takes off like a house afire. There’s action and chills galore in this non-stop thriller.”—Tess Gerritsen

Author Essay

Dear Reader,
 
I’ve looked forward to telling Deacon Novak’s story since the moment he appeared –unexpected and unplanned – on the crime scene in Did You Miss Me?   I swear I heard the music from the Dirty Harry movies in my head as he stood there, feet planted solidly, his leather coat flipping in the wind.
 
Deacon’s hair is snow white and his eyes are a unique mixture of blue and brown.  When he walked into my mind, I realized that he had really come from my own past.  Telling his story was cathartic to me on personal level. 
 
Deacon’s hair is white and his eyes are oddly colored because he has Waardenburg Syndrome – as do I.   Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition, passed on through either the mother or the father to the child.  There are four different types which can include “cosmetic” conditions such as loss of pigment in hair, eyes, and skin; partial to total deafness; and some more physically debilitating internal issues.  (Deacon’s bi-colored eyes are not the usual manifestation of WS – he took a bit of artistic liberty when he walked into my book.)
 
As a child, I had black hair with a white streak – like Rogue in X-Men.  That streak started to spread with I was fifteen and by thirty, my hair was snow white.  (I have a very good hairdresser!) My eyes are very blue – and very sensitive to light.  I am completely deaf in one ear and read lips to communicate.  The type of WS that runs in our family does not include any of the internal issues.  I was always thankful for that, but I still hated the symptoms that I did have.
 
Growing up, the most obvious difference was my hair and eyes.  Kids can be very cruel, you know.  I was bullied and made fun of unmercifully, and being small and timid, I never fought back.  I didn’t know how.  Every time I’d walk into a room, I’d fear the stares.  I yearned to be invisible.  To be “normal.”  To be like everyone else.
 
As I grew older, I gained confidence in the things I could do.  I hid my differences as best I could.  I felt not-quite-as-good as everyone else, until I met my husband – and even then it took me more than ten years to realize that he loved me BECAUSE of who I was and how I looked, not IN SPITE of.  That was a watershed moment for me.
 
As I said, writing Deacon’s character was cathartic.  How he deals with his differences is how I wished I’d dealt with mine, if I’d only known then all the things I know now.  Being a writer is cool that way.  You get to have do-overs.
 
So if you’re out there and you’re not “normal,” lift your chin and be proud of who you are.  Embrace your differences.   You are beautiful and don’t let anyone ever tell you that you’re not.
 
I hope you enjoy Deacon’s story as much as I enjoyed writing it!
 
All the best,
Karen

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