Hardcover $15.99

Wendy Lamb Books | Jan 10, 2012 | 320 Pages | 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 | Middle Grade (8-12) | ISBN 9780385734912

  • Paperback$7.99

    Yearling | Mar 12, 2013 | 320 Pages | 5-3/16 x 7-5/8 | Middle Grade (8-12) | ISBN 9780440422143

  • Hardcover$15.99

    Wendy Lamb Books | Jan 10, 2012 | 320 Pages | 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 | Middle Grade (8-12) | ISBN 9780385734912

  • Ebook$7.99

    Wendy Lamb Books | Jan 10, 2012 | 320 Pages | Middle Grade (8-12) | ISBN 9780375897368

  • Audiobook Download$22.00

    Listening Library (Audio) | Jan 24, 2012 | 480 Minutes | Middle Grade (8-12) | ISBN 9780307968234

  • CD$44.00

    Listening Library (Audio) | Jan 24, 2012 | 480 Minutes | Middle Grade (8-12) | ISBN 9780307968227

Awards

National Parenting Publications Awards (NAPPA) Gold Award WINNER

ALA Notable Children’s Book NOMINEE

Maryland Black-Eyed Susan Award NOMINEE 2013

Missouri Mark Twain Award NOMINEE 2015

New York State Charlotte Award NOMINEE 2014

Tennessee Volunteer State Book Award NOMINEE

Vermont Dorothy Canfield Fischer Book Award NOMINEE 2014

NAACP Image Awards FINALIST

Praise

Publisher’s Weekly Best Children’s Book of 2012

Kirkus Reviews Best Teen’s Book of 2012


Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, December 15, 2011:
“Deza is one great heroine in her own right, a fitting literary companion to Bud Caldwell.”

Starred Review, Publishers Weekly, December 12, 2011:
“Though the resolution of the family’s crisis is perhaps far-fetched, some readers will feel they are due a bit of happiness; others will be struck by how little has changed in 75 years for the nation’s have-nots.”




From the Hardcover edition.

Author Q&A

An excerpt from Christopher Paul Curtis’s Afterword in his novel, THE MIGHTY MISS MALONE:
 
Even though Deza is a fictional character, many of her woes are based on the lives and struggles of very real children. A particularly rich and heartbreaking source was the collection of letters children sent to President Roosevelt during the Great Depression.
                           
Authors are frequently asked what they want a particular book to accomplish. What I want The Mighty Miss Malone to do is, first, to provide an enjoyable read. Second, as with all of my books, I want this to be a springboard for young people to ask questions and do more research on some of the themes the book explores, in this case the Great Depression and poverty in general. And third, I hope that Deza can serve as a voice for the estimated fifteen million American children who are poor, who go to bed hungry and whose parents struggle to make a dignified living to feed and care for them. After writing that last sentence, I can’t help feeling this: the fact that in late 2011 I can write that there are fifteen million poor children in this country is, to quote the Mighty Miss Malone, “A tragedy, a true tragedy.”

-Christopher Paul Curtis
 
(Figures are from the National Poverty Center of the University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy—2009 Poverty Thresholds.)

 

An excerpt from Christopher Paul Curtis’s Afterword in his novel, THE MIGHTY MISS MALONE:
 
Even though Deza is a fictional character, many of her woes are based on the lives and struggles of very real children. A particularly rich and heartbreaking source was the collection of letters children sent to President Roosevelt during the Great Depression.
                           
Authors are frequently asked what they want a particular book to accomplish. What I want The Mighty Miss Malone to do is, first, to provide an enjoyable read. Second, as with all of my books, I want this to be a springboard for young people to ask questions and do more research on some of the themes the book explores, in this case the Great Depression and poverty in general. And third, I hope that Deza can serve as a voice for the estimated fifteen million American children who are poor, who go to bed hungry and whose parents struggle to make a dignified living to feed and care for them. After writing that last sentence, I can’t help feeling this: the fact that in late 2011 I can write that there are fifteen million poor children in this country is, to quote the Mighty Miss Malone, “A tragedy, a true tragedy.”

-Christopher Paul Curtis
 
(Figures are from the National Poverty Center of the University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy—2009 Poverty Thresholds.)

 

An excerpt from Christopher Paul Curtis’s Afterword in his novel, THE MIGHTY MISS MALONE:
 
Even though Deza is a fictional character, many of her woes are based on the lives and struggles of very real children. A particularly rich and heartbreaking source was the collection of letters children sent to President Roosevelt during the Great Depression.
                           
Authors are frequently asked what they want a particular book to accomplish. What I want The Mighty Miss Malone to do is, first, to provide an enjoyable read. Second, as with all of my books, I want this to be a springboard for young people to ask questions and do more research on some of the themes the book explores, in this case the Great Depression and poverty in general. And third, I hope that Deza can serve as a voice for the estimated fifteen million American children who are poor, who go to bed hungry and whose parents struggle to make a dignified living to feed and care for them. After writing that last sentence, I can’t help feeling this: the fact that in late 2011 I can write that there are fifteen million poor children in this country is, to quote the Mighty Miss Malone, “A tragedy, a true tragedy.”

-Christopher Paul Curtis
 
(Figures are from the National Poverty Center of the University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy—2009 Poverty Thresholds.)

 

An excerpt from Christopher Paul Curtis’s Afterword in his novel, THE MIGHTY MISS MALONE:
 
Even though Deza is a fictional character, many of her woes are based on the lives and struggles of very real children. A particularly rich and heartbreaking source was the collection of letters children sent to President Roosevelt during the Great Depression.
                           
Authors are frequently asked what they want a particular book to accomplish. What I want The Mighty Miss Malone to do is, first, to provide an enjoyable read. Second, as with all of my books, I want this to be a springboard for young people to ask questions and do more research on some of the themes the book explores, in this case the Great Depression and poverty in general. And third, I hope that Deza can serve as a voice for the estimated fifteen million American children who are poor, who go to bed hungry and whose parents struggle to make a dignified living to feed and care for them. After writing that last sentence, I can’t help feeling this: the fact that in late 2011 I can write that there are fifteen million poor children in this country is, to quote the Mighty Miss Malone, “A tragedy, a true tragedy.”

-Christopher Paul Curtis
 
(Figures are from the National Poverty Center of the University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy—2009 Poverty Thresholds.)

 

An excerpt from Christopher Paul Curtis’s Afterword in his novel, THE MIGHTY MISS MALONE:
 
Even though Deza is a fictional character, many of her woes are based on the lives and struggles of very real children. A particularly rich and heartbreaking source was the collection of letters children sent to President Roosevelt during the Great Depression.
                           
Authors are frequently asked what they want a particular book to accomplish. What I want The Mighty Miss Malone to do is, first, to provide an enjoyable read. Second, as with all of my books, I want this to be a springboard for young people to ask questions and do more research on some of the themes the book explores, in this case the Great Depression and poverty in general. And third, I hope that Deza can serve as a voice for the estimated fifteen million American children who are poor, who go to bed hungry and whose parents struggle to make a dignified living to feed and care for them. After writing that last sentence, I can’t help feeling this: the fact that in late 2011 I can write that there are fifteen million poor children in this country is, to quote the Mighty Miss Malone, “A tragedy, a true tragedy.”

-Christopher Paul Curtis
 
(Figures are from the National Poverty Center of the University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy—2009 Poverty Thresholds.)

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