Starting Out In the Afternoon

Paperback $12.95

Vintage Canada | Mar 25, 2003 | 256 Pages | 5-5/16 x 7-1/4 | ISBN 9780679311881

  • Paperback$12.95

    Vintage Canada | Mar 25, 2003 | 256 Pages | 5-5/16 x 7-1/4 | ISBN 9780679311881

  • Ebook$9.99

    Vintage Canada | Jul 07, 2010 | ISBN 9780307369123

Awards

Governor General’s Literary Award – Nonfiction FINALIST 2002

Praise

“It is a beautifully written book, marked by original language and disciplined prose, every page offering a memorable snapshot of the author’s often impossibly grand physical surroundings…. for anyone who loves the outdoors Starting Out In the Afternoon is a trip worth taking.” — The Ottawa Citizen

Starting Out in the Afternoon is a wonderfully written tale of a middle-aged woman’s journey through the wilds of Canada and Alaska. But the book, written in diary form, is more than a travelogue. Woven into the rich descriptions of rugged mountains, mammoth trees and powerful seas are the thoughts of a woman exploring her life’s journey…. The only downside to this work is that it makes the reader grieve for the fact that Frayne didn’t start publishing earlier in life.” — The Toronto Sun

“Her sentences are spare, yet their images intense. Her eye is sharp.” — The Edmonton Journal

Starting Out in the Afternoon is Jilly Frayne’s clear-eyed memoir of the trek — by car, sneaker and kayak — that drew her to the Yukon, all the way from her home in southern Ontario and her career as a family therapist. In the end, she discovers that the toughest, most rewarding road trip is the one you take inside your own head and heart.” — Chatelaine

“With verve, ambition and, it seems, very little fear, [Jill Frayne] conquered B.C.’s northern wilderness, bringing back stories of personal transformation at the mid-point of [her] life.” — The Vancouver Sun

“Frayne is very much an original, with a bracing, vibrant style fresh as a gust of northern wind. Her memoir of a mid-life trek into deep wilderness is less travelogue than soul-revealing confession, a cri du coeur riddled with the complex, pulsing veins of relationship — not just with other people, but with that great and glorious enigma, the land…. Frayne writes early on that the initial idea for her journey was inspired by a Peter Gzowski interview on Morningside. How he would have loved this fresh, windy, woodsmoky piece of poetry, so full of passion and vulnerability. No doubt Frayne’s parents are immensely proud of their intrepid, inspired girl.” — The Gazette (Montreal)

“This memoir of her travels is an involving, inspired balm for us armchair travellers.” — The Toronto Star

“Frayne’s account of her spiritual and physical journey is a fun, introspective look into the inner workings of a woman’s mind as she reflects on what has been and what is yet possible.” — The Guelph Mercury

“[A] well-crafted, tough-minded recounting of [Jill Frayne’s] voyage out and then inward . . . . Her metaphors enrich the journey and her personal reflections give the shock of recognition that hard-won truths can bring.” — Quill and Quire

“[T]he writing is transcendental, ecstatic, as crisp and clear as Lake Superior in October. . . . As the daughter of June Callwood and Trent Frayne, she comes by it honestly, but genetics cannot explain the breath-taking sweep of her style, the depths of her insights. Through words as carefully chosen and necessary as survival gear, she journeys to the heart of her wild self.” — Wayne Grady, The Globe and Mail

"This voyage of a middle-aged woman through Canada’s wildest landscape is so well rendered that the readers longs to take the same journey. As Jill Frayne conquers her own fears, the landscape, which can be rough, cold and unforgiving, comes into focus as a warm, wonderful friend. Frayne writes so beautifully about her relationship with nature that the book becomes a detailed love story." — Catherine Gildiner, author of Too Close to the Falls

"Jill Frayne’s journeys into wilderness are like moving meditations, undertaken with awareness and respect, awash in wisdom, insight and the serenity that exists in the soul of the natural world. Travelling with her is, therefore, a transcendent experience." — Alison Wearing, author of Honeymoon in Purdah

Also by Jill Frayne

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