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Stupid to the Last Drop

Stupid to the Last Drop by William Marsden
Paperback
Sep 30, 2008 | 256 Pages
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  • Paperback $16.95

    Sep 30, 2008 | 256 Pages

  • Ebook $12.99

    May 28, 2010 | 256 Pages

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Praise

“[Marsden brings] a fresh pair of discerning eyes to an unusual series of nation-changing events. . . . [H]e confidently reports how an entire province is destroying itself, and then asks why no one in Canada ‘seems to care.’ . . . The biggest stupidities that Marsden discovers could and probably should shock any Canadian. . . . Yet Marsden’s unsettling exposé of careless decision-making sheds more needed light on some very dark corners in Alberta (and Canada). He has walked into a provincial boom-town, populated largely by arrogant and greedy males (Hells Angels with suits), and not flinched. Good on you, partner.” —Andrew Nikiforuk, The Globe and Mail

“This is a powerfully eloquent polemic.” —Edmonton Journal (September 14)

“Marsden’s book is an engaging and entertaining read. . . . [A] worthwhile read and it will likely generate a fair bit of discussion about the industry.” —National Post

“[Marsden’s] book is a good primer on many of these urgent problems . . . Marsden has held the environmental mirror up to Albertans and it’s not a pretty sight—as many here have known for some time. . . . Marsden tells his story with a judicious mixture of personal stories and technical details of oil and gas extraction.” —Edmonton Journal

“For the . . . dozen or so Albertans who believe the energy industry and its friends in the Alberta government are neither all good nor all bad and who believe the same of ardent death-to-civilization environmentalists[you] need to read this book. . . . [T]his book could not have come out at a more opportune time. Marsden takes the worries of ordinary citizens and voices them . . . he pulls together all the disparate concerns into a readable whole. . . . None of us can feel smug. The sensible use of non-renewable resources is all of our duty, regardless of our association with the energy business.” —Calgary Herald


From the Hardcover edition.

Awards

National Business Book Award WINNER 2007

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