Skip to Main Content (Press Enter)
Check Out
The Bestselling Books of All Time
See the List
Toggle side nav

The Greedy Goat

Best Seller
The Greedy Goat by Petr Horacek
Hardcover $15.99
May 08, 2018 | ISBN 9780763694975

Also available from:

  • May 08, 2018 | ISBN 9780763694975 | 2-5 years

    Also available from:

*This title is not eligible for purchase to earn points nor for redemption with your code in the Reader Rewards program

Product Details

Praise

“A distinctive and extremely funny cautionary tale about a goat who’s had enough of eating grass. Now in paperback, it also teaches colours and the days of the week.”
—The Bookseller

Horácek’s richly textured art is large enough to share at a distance—and wonderful to pore over up close. The cautionary tale of overeating calls to mind The Very Hungry Caterpillar. But, unlike Carle’s metamorphosed-into-beauty caterpillar, Horácek’s stubborn goat stays just as she is: greedy and hilariously foolish. Delectable. A surefire hit with hungry goats and hungry readers alike.
—Kirkus Reviews

Done in bright hues and inviting textures, the folksy mixed-media illustrations work in harmony with the rhythmic, well-paced telling…This delightful cautionary tale has crowd-pleasing artwork, giggle-inducing humor, and plenty of opportunity for participation, either in storytime or small group sharing.
—School Library Journal

There’s an Eric Carle feel to the simple, carefully structured tale, and the rhythms are particularly effective in making this a humorous audience pleaser. There are Carle-esque touches in the mixed-media art as well…This is a natural for a toddler storytime or a spirited lapsit; just be prepared to bust out your very best impression of an ailing goat.
—Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

In Mr. Horacek’s amusing pictures, we see the goat snacking her way through the barnyard, devouring the other animals’ food before tucking into a house plant and a shoe. The silly creature even eats the farmer’s boxer shorts, plucking them from the clothesline like a sybarite eating grapes.
—The Wall Street Journal

Back to Top