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LOAC Essentials Series

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LOAC Essentials Volume 11: "Cap" Stubbs and Tippie, 1945 by Edwina Dumm
LOAC Essentials Volume 13: Charlie Chan, 1938 by Alfred Andriola
LOAC Essentials Volume 14: Barney Google, 1928 by Billy deBeck

LOAC Essentials Series : Titles in Order

Book 14
Laugh at some of the most famous sequences of the biggest and funniest cartoon stars of comics history, reprinted here for the first time.

This book reprints four classic stories that are emblematic of what made the strip great. Barney and his horse Spark Plug get involved in all sorts of hijinks and schemes when they enter the Million-Dollar Cross-Country Marathon, decide to swim the English Channel, and when Barney joins the Secret and Mysterious Order of the Brotherhood of Billy Goats (in DeBeck’s send-up of secret societies and fraternal lodges), culminating in Barney Google’s historic run for President of the United States in 1928!

LOAC Essentials reprints, in yearly volumes, the daily newspaper strips that are essential to comics history, strips that are unique creations in their right, while also contributing to the advancement of the medium.
Book 13
A key early work from the creator of the long-running detective series Kerry Drake presented in a format that is as close as one can get to experiencing it as a daily comic.

As a famed hero of the mystery novels by Earl Derr Biggers, Inspector Charlie Chan reached even greater heights in a series of popular movies. As actor Sidney Toler was preparing to replace Warner Oland as the wily police detective in 1938, Alfred Andriola was tapped to create a newspaper strip version of the character. Andriola was secretary to Milton (Terry and the Pirates) Caniff and Chan would be his first cartooning effort, but with some friends in Caniff’s orbit, Andriola succeeded in producing what The World Encyclopedia of Comics says is “among the best comic strips in the ‘Caniff school.'”

The pride of the Honolulu Police Department uses his intellect more than his fists to solve cases of international intrigue, and the syndicate’s initial promotion called Charlie Chan “A new mystery strip, totally devoid of guns and gangsters” to separate it from Dick Tracy and his many hard-boiled imitators. Not that the strip is devoid of action and romance–Chan’s tall, handsome assistant, Kirk Barrow, shoulders those “difficult” burdens with aplomb. Featuring the first complete year of daily strips, from October 1938 to November 1939, this volume of LOAC Essentials offers readers exciting adventures, snappy dialogue, and arresting art, making it a fascinating complement to Caniff’s own efforts on Terry and the Pirates during this period.
Book 12
Reprinted for the very first time, these century-old strips comprise a key early work from the creator of Krazy Kat, perhaps the most lauded cartoonist of all time.

This book concludes a three-volume LOAC Essentials sub-series by presenting the final year of Baron Bean, one of Herriman’s richest and funniest creations, second only to Krazy Kat, whose citizens would occasionally grace these panels.

Herriman found few themes as fascinating as the power of titles and the ways in which worth in society is determined based on a hat, a name, or the color of one’s skin. Each day he gives reason to question not only the superiority of would-be “Barons” over their vassals and retainers, but equally the superiority of so-called “humans” over the animals they call “pets.”
Book 11
Collecting the works of one of the most important female cartoonists of all time, Tippie will appeal to comics readers, students of women’s studies, and dog lovers.

Edwina Dumm was the country’s first female full-time editorial cartoonist, and one of its first female syndicated comic strip creators. Tippie is truly a Library of American Comics Essential, providing a crucial reading experience and offering perspective on the early work of women in the field.

Here you’ll find a delightful and enlightening year of comic strips starring the lovable shaggy dog named Tippie; his companion, the mischievous young boy named Cap Stubbs; and Cap’s wise Grandma. The strip, which ran from 1918 to 1966, started as a gag-a-day comic, but by the mid-1940s was clearly a continuing saga about homespun life in a small town.

LOAC Essentials reprints, one year at a time, the daily newspaper strips that are essential to comics history, in a format that preserves, as closely as possible, the original reader experience. By reproducing the strips one per page in an oblong format, it allows us to have the experience of reading the comics one day at a time. Each volume contains seminal strips that are unique creations in their right and also contributed to the advancement of the medium, along with panel-by-panel annotations.

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