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Dick Tracy Series

Chester Gould
Dick Tracy introduced violence — blunt, ironic, and retributional violence — to the comics page. The quintissential Dick Tracy line about his crimefighting tactics? “I’m going to shoot first and investigate later!” The strip is also notable for its introduction of scientific detection to comics, a theme that Gould continued to exploit well into the 1960s. And now, more than 80 years after the first Tracy strips, Gould’s massive body of work is being collected in its entirety.
Complete Chester Gould's Dick Tracy Volume 3 by Chester Gould
Complete Chester Gould's Dick Tracy Volume 28 by Chester Gould
Complete Chester Gould's Dick Tracy Volume 29 by Chester Gould

Dick Tracy Series : Titles in Order

Book 29
This last volume in the series completes the iconic comic series by Chester Gould. The adventures of this iconic square-jawed detective fighting a menagerie of grotesque villains remains one of the highlights in the history of not just comics but crime fiction in general.

After 46 years-two months-and-twentyone-days writing and drawing Dick Tracy Chester Gould retired at the age of 77. In these historic final strips, Gould pits his dynamic detective against the latest in a long line of grotesque villains–Pucker Puss, the hitman who literally spits death at his opponents. Tracy, meanwhile, takes his law and order campaign to television, while his past catches up to him when a criminal he helped convict twenty years ago puts the detective on his “to kill” list. To round out this volume, the squadroom is kept busy with two members of B.O. Plenty’s extended family who are anything but law-abiding–Perfume Plenty and her larcenous cousin Dade. All this and more in the ultimate volume of Chester Gould’s Dick Tracy, collecting strips from March 15, 1976 to December 25, 1977.

The series is ripe to introduce to crime prose readers who haven’t previously ventured into comics.
Book 28
The adventures of this iconic square-jawed detective fighting a menagerie of grotesque villains remains one of the highlights in the history of not just comics but crime fiction in general.

In these latter-day Dick Tracy adventures Chester Gould again proves that he was never one to rest on his laurels. The square-jawed detective fights it out with one thug after another, including Lispy and the visually grotesque villain appropriately named The Brain. These stories are replete with murder, suicide, gangland execution, dope smuggling, a deadly natural disaster, and not one but two main characters on the verge of death. The singular motive behind it all? Money, plenty of money.

All this and the return of retired Chief Brandon in the penultimate volume of Chester Gould’s Dick Tracy, collecting strips from July 7, 1974 to March 14, 1976.
Book 27
The adventures of this iconic square-jawed detective fighting a menagerie of grotesque villains remains one of the highlights in the history of not just comics but crime fiction in general.

With one end of a rope around Tracy’s neck and the other end attached to an innocent young boy hanging out of a high-rise window, Chester Gould proves that he can still invent unique death traps for the sharp-jawed detective. The tension and excitement continue throughout the stories collected in this book, as Tracy and his team are led on one relentless chase after another. And just when they think they’ve captured the criminal mastermind known as “Button,” he escapes…and escapes again!

Also featured are Button’s sister named Hope Lezz; the knife-throwing ex-vaudevillian Keeno-the-Great; a con man named Big Brass, who peddles atomic nose rings; and a seemingly demure grandmother named Florabelle, who dresses up her long-dead brother’s skull with a wig, hat, shirt, tie, and cigar…and just happens to keep a razor-sharp guillotine in her basement. Things never slow down in Dick Tracy Volume 27, which reprints all dailies and Sundays from September 25, 1972 to July 6, 1974.
Book 26
The adventures of the iconic square-jawed detective fighting a menagerie of bizarre villains remains one of the highlights in the history of not just comics, but crime fiction in general.

Having returned to policing duty on Planet Earth, former Space Sheriff Tracy finds a world markedly changed from the one he left. Feeling handcuffed by expanded legal protections afforded suspects and stricter guidelines of evidence, Tracy all but begs bad guys to shoot first, and he may get his wish, thanks to nemeses such as explosion-crazed Jonny Scorn, the hand-grenade toting revolutionary called El Tigress, and the aptly-named Dope King, in a story that features Tracy’s most direct assault on drug traffickers, coinciding with Richard Nixon’s “War on Drugs!”

These early ’70s adventures also see the dauntless detective facing off against one of the strip’s best late-era grotesque villains: Pouch, who uses a repulsive hidden flap in his neck to hide anything from stolen diamonds to automatic pistols. The plot also features a rare return by an earlier villain, as the Mole is released from prison after serving nineteen years, only to learn his granddaughter, Molene, is part of Pouch’s gang!

All this, plus: Tracy grows a mustache, Groovy seems to fall for a certain long-legged policewoman, and Gravel Gertie tries to figure out the mysterious link between the world’s oldest tattoo artist and a million dollars in missing gems. Finally, an attempted burglary of rare metals from Diet Smith’s plant introduces Peanut Butter, the smartest kid in the strip since Brilliant, the inventor of the Two-Way Wrist Radio.

Volume 26 reprints all dailies and Sundays from December 24, 1970 to September 27, 1972.
Book 25
The adventures of this iconic square-jawed detective fighting a menagerie of grotesque villains remain one of the highlights in the history of not just comics but crime fiction in general. The series is ripe to introduce to crime prose readers who haven’t previously ventured into comics.

Dick Tracy closes out the 1960s by moonlighting–literally! The master sleuth takes a part-time second job as Head of Security and Law Enforcement for Diet Smith’s operations based on the moon. Soon Tracy learns that an international crime syndicate, the Apparatus, has infiltrated Smith’s organization on the lunar surface. Determined to expand its nefarious empire, the Apparatus snares Dick and Tess Tracy, leaving them caught in one of the most frightening death traps in the history of the series. In the aftermath Dick Tracy is left blind, with the killers still after him! Tracy then meets Tinky, a young blind girl who will play a key role throughout the 1970s.

Two other major characters are also introduced. First is cartoonist Vera Alldid, who comes looking for his step-uncle B.O. Plenty and instead finds himself enamored with B.O. and Gravel Gertie’s daughter Sparkle. Is there such a thing as “kissin’ step-cousins?” The second is Groovy Grove, fresh from prison after serving twelve years for a crime he didn’t commit. Groovy joins the police force and not only has to defend himself against a blackmail scheme from his former cellmate, Diamonds, and his accomplice the Doll…he has to rescue kidnapped little Tinky! All this and more in these classic Chester Gould comic strips, from April 3, 1969 to December 23, 1970.
Book 24
The iconic square-jawed detective’s adventures fighting a menagerie of grotesque villains remain a highlight in the history of comics and of crime fiction in general. This series is ripe to introduce to crime prose readers who haven’t previously ventured into comics.

Chester Gould’s morality play enters the late ’60s, as the cartoonist tackles concepts of retribution, constitutional rights, economic warfare, and Space Age intrigue–all amidst the usual array of murder and violence. The stakes, however, seem higher, and the body count soars: death in space, on the high seas, behind closed doors–by gun, by laser, by asphyxiation, by explosion, and by freezing. The action moves from Earth to the lunar surface as Moon Maid zaps bad guys, Lizz goes undercover, Tracy nearly loses his head–and, when Diet Smith sets up a factory on the moon, will mankind also export greed and murder to its crime-free orbiting satellite? Bad guys include steely mobster Piggy Butcher, Chin Chillar, underworld boss Mr. Intro, and the bootlegger named Posie, among others. Plus the return of Sparkle Plenty and a special feature about the aborted 1967 Dick Tracy TV show from the same producer who made Batman a pop culture icon. Included are all strips from July 3, 1967 to April 2, 1969.
Book 10
Calling all law-abiding citizens! Witness the introduction of the famous Two-Way Wrist Radio, created by the aptly-named Brilliant! Enjoy an ever-expanding cast that includes Diet Smith, Themesong, and Christmas Early, as well as the return of Vitamin Flintheart and Snowflake, while the two most unlikely characters get married! Thrill to the capers staged by the villains Influence, Shoulders, Itchy, Nilon Hose, and Gargles!

Edited and designed by Eisner Award-winner Dean Mullaney, with introductions by Max Allan Collins and Jeff Kersten, this collection contains all the Dick Tracy daily and Sunday comic strips published from September 20, 1945 through March 16, 1947.
Book 5
Presenting the fifth volume of IDW Publishing’s deluxe hardcover collection of Chester Gould’s timeless comic strip, Dick Tracy! Volume Five once again contains over 500 comic strips from the series’ early years, this time covering material that originally ran from January 1938 through July 1939. Included in this collection are Tracy story arcs such as “Chief Shellberry,” Karpse,” “Scardol,” and “Whip Chute.”
Book 3
Presenting the third volume of IDW Publishing’s deluxe hardcover collection of Chester Gould’s timeless comic strip, Dick Tracy. Volume Three once again contains over 500 comic strips from the series’ early years, this time covering material that originally ran from January 1935 through June 1936. This special volume features an introduction from Consulting Editor and longtime Tracy writer Max Allan Collins. Each volume will feature book design from award-winning designer/artist Ashley Wood. -The Library of American Comics is the world’s #1 publisher of classic newspaper comic strips, with 14 Eisner Award nominations and three wins for best book.
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