The Sacred Band

Paperback $15.95

Anchor | Apr 17, 2012 | 784 Pages | 5-3/16 x 8 | ISBN 9780307947154

  • Paperback$15.95

    Anchor | Apr 17, 2012 | 784 Pages | 5-3/16 x 8 | ISBN 9780307947154

  • Mass Market Paperback$7.99

    Anchor | Jan 31, 2012 | 752 Pages | 4-3/16 x 6-7/8 | ISBN 9780307739605

  • Ebook$7.99

    Anchor | Oct 04, 2011 | 544 Pages | ISBN 9780307739698

Praise

Praise for David Anthony Durham and The Acacia Trilogy:
 
“A fascinating world.”
USA Today
 
“A big, fat, rich piece of history-flavored fantasy. . . . Imagined with remarkable thoroughness.”
Time
 
“Gripping. . . . From the first pages of Acacia, Durham demonstrates that he is a master of the fantasy epic.”
The Washington Post Book World
 
“Thrilling. . . . Durham’s new world—like our old one—is crawling with wickedly fascinating characters.”
Entertainment Weekly
 
“Transcendent. . . . As fantasy epics go, the ‘Acacia’ trilogy is a direct and worthy descendant of Tolkien.” —Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star
 
“A truly epic fantasy . . . Superbly written.”
Fantasy Magazine
 
“Something genuinely new. . . . Strong echoes of Homer and Virgil, Tolkien, Norse mythology’s Twilight of the Gods and America’s compromised history as a republic built on slavery fuse into an enthralling, literate and increasingly suspenseful narrative.”
Kirkus Reviews (starred)
 
“Never lets up. . . . A very tasty fantasy stew.”
San Jose Mercury News
 
“Extraordinary. . . . One of the best books, fantasy or otherwise . . . in recent memory.”
Free-Lance Star
 
“Excellent. . . . A multi-layered, page-turning series that pushes the envelope of epic fantasy.”
Contra Costa Times

Author Essay

On Meeting George
by David Anthony Durham
 
I was out with a gang of writers at my very first World Fantasy Convention in 2007. We were grabbing a meal before heading back to the conference center for the mass signing session, where all the authors at the conference sit at tables, available to sign autographs.
 
“Whatever you do at the signing session,” one of my companions said, “don’t sit next to George R. R. Martin. It’ll destroy your soul.”
 
Good advice. GRRM would have a line of fans a mile long. Anyone sitting next to him would suffer the indignity of having to make paper airplanes, while trying not to look too desperate for somebody, anybody, to ask for a signature. Wouldn’t want to be that fool!
 
Or…would I? I started scheming. Even if nobody wanted to sit next to GRRM, someone would definitely have to. And wouldn’t that person have a long window of time to talk to him? Wouldn’t that be a good thing? A networking opportunity even!
 
“But David,” I said to myself, “remember that time with Neil Gaiman?”
 
True enough. At another conference I’d gotten the chance to hang out with Mr. Stardust. It should’ve been easy. I loved his work. It was fresh in my mind. Even my kids were fans! Lots of stuff to talk about, right? Not really, it turned out. I was a tongue-tied oaf the entire time. The most coherent thing I managed to say was when he drew a picture of a rat on my copy of Coraline. I said, “Nice rat.”
 
And there was that time I tried to have a conversation with Guy Gavriel Kay…in the restroom. Not the best idea.
 
I resolved to do better with GRRM.
 
So later—buoyed by several alcoholic beverages—I walked into the signing room and scanned the tables. Sure enough, there was GRRM, sitting by himself.
 
“Excuse me, Mr. Martin, do you mind if I sit here?”
 
He assented. Behind his beard I detected signs of caution, though. Perhaps he was wondering what manner of fool I was.
 
I sat down, introduced myself, praised his work, and mentioned my book, the recently published Acacia: The War with the Mein. A dangerous moment, this. He could have shrugged and said, “Never heard of you.”
 
Instead, he jovially said, “Acacia…I’ve heard good things about it.”
 
Just then, a horde of autograph seekers descended on us. Well…on him. I figured it was time to start folding paper into aerodynamic shapes. But, to my surprise, we kept on chatting.
 
It ended up being a very enjoyable conversation. So much so that when someone arrived in front of me, I didn’t immediately understand why he was holding my book. George looked up from signing long enough to assess the situation.
 
He smiled and said, “You’ve got a fan.”

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