The Shameless Carnivore

Ebook $12.99

Clarkson Potter | Mar 18, 2008 | 304 Pages | 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 | ISBN 9780767929226

  • Ebook$12.99

    Clarkson Potter | Mar 18, 2008 | 304 Pages | 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 | ISBN 9780767929226

Praise

"[Gold’s] often amusing first-person account of acquiring, cooking, serving and eating his prey is interspersed with occasional recitations of fun factorids. As a writer, Gold is entertaining, with a punchy, extemporaneous tone that sounds like as if he were doing stand-up. He goes for the laughs and often gets them." — Holly Brubach, The New York Times Style Magazine

"[Gold’s] book is laugh-out-loud funny. But it is also quite thoughtful." –Judy Walker, The Times-Picayune

"[Gold] has devoted a good portion of the book to the ethics of eating animals, the comparative merits (taste, health and conscience) of organic and free-range meats and the (rightly) exalted status of the responsible hunter. Gold has the utmost respect for "the integrity of meat" and demonstrates it brilliantly throughout his book." –Christine Sismondo, The Toronto Star

"The Shameless Carnivore
is an unapologetically funny, provacative yet meticulously researched examination of the author’s red-blooded appetite. The book also maps out the culture wars involving omnivores, vegetarians, vegans, PETA and animal slaughter." –Alexandyr Kent, The Shreveport Times

"Rare in the growing tide of books on vegetarian cooking, Gold’s memoir of meat is well done. And while he offers bites of history and health in his "Manifesto for Meat Lovers," the meat of his tale is his mission to eat 31 different meats – from alligator to yak – in 31 days. Our advice to anyone who would try to mimic the good-humored author: Don’t fill up on bread!" –Bill Heller, The New York Post

"Gold spent a month eating a different kind of meat each day, including offal, and in the course of a serious discussion about food choices–“Vegetarians also get attacked on a regular basis,” a friend tells him, referring to holiday meals–his book forces the squeamish among us to confront things we’d rather forget (for example, that barbecued ribs are referred to as “skeletal meats”). Gold suggests that vegetarians and carnivores can live in peace if they don’t try to evangelize. The formula for health, he writes, is the same for all: “Eat right, eat less, and exercise more.” –The New Yorker.com

Also by Scott Gold

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