Get personalized recommendations and earn points toward a free book!
Check Out
The Bestselling Books of All Time
See the List
'68 by Paco Ignacio Taibo II

’68

Best Seller
'68 by Paco Ignacio Taibo II
Paperback
Jan 06, 2004 | 144 Pages
See All Formats (2) +
  • Paperback $16.95

    Jan 06, 2004 | 144 Pages

  • Paperback $12.95

    Jan 06, 2004 | 144 Pages

  • Ebook $10.99

    Jan 04, 2011 | 144 Pages

*This title is not eligible for purchase to earn points nor for redemption with your code in the Reader Rewards program

Product Details

Praise

Now available for the first time in English, Mexican author and essayist Taibo’s beautifully realized memoir of the Oct. 1968 Tlatelolco student massacre in Mexico City documents “The Movement” of students that, at one point, was half a million strong. Taibo begins more than a decade before the massacre, when the movement was inchoate and the “invisible enemy” was purely an intellectual concern. He evokes relationships, passions and arguments lovingly. (Relevant section titles include “Of Women and Mattresses,” “And Sometimes We Believe in the Informative Value of Tremors Running Through the Atmosphere” and “In Which the Virtues of the National Anthem Are Rediscovered.”) The Cuban revolution and the Vietnamese resistance galvanized democratic idealists across Mexico, and The Movement turned to action: widespread propaganda dispersion, silent demonstrations, flash rallies, community organizing and the 123-day strikes in high schools and universities across the country. Then, as the impact of the student revolt in Paris in May 1968 reverberated throughout the world and governments became increasingly reactive, 200 protesting students were murdered in Tlatelolco Square by government military police, and hundreds more were arrested and jailed. In the days and weeks following, the corpses of the slain students disappeared, the facts were contorted by government-controlled media, and reality turned to myth. Today, over 35 years later, much of the truth remains uncovered, but Taibo’s memoir goes a long way toward setting the record straight.—Publishers Weekly

Looking for More Great Reads?
Download our Spring Fiction Sampler Now
Back to Top