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Blood and Germs by Gail Jarrow

Blood and Germs

Best Seller
Blood and Germs by Gail Jarrow
Hardcover $18.99
Oct 13, 2020 | ISBN 9781684371761

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  • Oct 13, 2020 | ISBN 9781684371761 | Middle Grade (10 and up)

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  • Oct 13, 2020 | ISBN 9781635923346 | 10-14 years

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Product Details

Praise

★ ”For those interested in the history of medicine or fascinated by the Civil War, Jarrow’s latest offering astutely combines both topics. Making outstanding use of period photographs, in-depth research, and firsthand accounts, this effort chronicles the inadequate, sometimes almost farcically deficient medical care delivered during the war. Highlighting primary topics in a series of brief chapters, it follows soldiers through the typical responses to being wounded (or falling ill), from frontline interventions through field hospitals, then, via torturous ambulance journeys, to immense pavilion hospitals that both Union and Confederate sides were forced to establish. Outstanding backmatter, more typical of what might be found in fine adult nonfiction, rounds out this stellar presentation. A fascinating example of excellence in juvenile nonfiction.”  —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Although the concern with viruses is now ever-present, Jarrow shows in this well-documented informational book how germs and disease also shaped the Civil War. Archival photos on almost every page and sidebars about individual soldiers make the accounts personal and more harrowing. A time line and extensive online resources complete this masterful look at early medicine.” —Booklist 

“Drawing from extensive archival sources, Jarrow (The Poison Eaters) debuts her Medical Fiascoes trilogy by skillfully narrating Civil War stories of soldiers who died not from bullets but from diseases such as typhus, typhoid, tuberculosis, gangrene, and malaria, and of the doctors and nurses who tried to save them. The book skillfully incorporates 19th-century newspaper typefaces and archival photographs, and employs eye-catching headings such as ‘Mercury and Maggots’ and ‘Malignant Pus.’ Jarrow also packs her pages with profiles of little-known heroes, such as Alexander Augusta, the first Black doctor to become a commissioned surgeon in the Union Army, and military doctor Mary Walker, the only woman to ever receive the Congressional Medal of Honor.”— Publishers Weekly

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