Get personalized recommendations and earn points toward a free book!
Check Out
The Bestselling Books of All Time
See the List

Library of America Eudora Welty Edition

Eudora Welty
Eudora Welty: Complete Novels (LOA #101) by Eudora Welty
Eudora Welty: Stories, Essays, & Memoirs (LOA #102) by Eudora Welty

Library of America Eudora Welty Edition : Titles in Order

Book 2
In this volume along with its companion, The Library of America presents all of the most significant and best-loved works of Eudora Welty. Of her own work, she wrote: “What I do in writing of any character is to try to enter into the mind, heart, and skin of a human being who is not myself. Whether this happens to be a man or a woman, old or young, with skin black or white, the primary challenge lies in making the jump itself. It is the act of a writer’s imagination that I set most high.”

Stories, Essays and Memoir presents Welty’s collected short stories, an astonishing body of work that has made her one of the most respected writers of short fiction. A Curtain of Green and Other Stories (1941), her first book, includes many of her most popular stories, such as “A Worn Path.” “Powerhouse,” and the farcical “Why I Live at the P.O.”

The Wide Net and Other Stories (1943), in which historical figures such as Aaron Burr (“First Love”) and John James Audubon (“A Still Moment”) appear as characters, shows her evolving mastery as a regional chronicler.

The Golden Apples (1946) is a series of interrelated stories about the inhabitants of the fictional town of Morgana, Mississippi. It was Welty’s favorite among her books, and she described it as “an experience in a writer’s own discovery of affinities. In writing, as in life, the connections of all sorts of relationships and kinds lie in wait of discovery, and give out their signals to the Geiger counter of the charged imagination, once it is drawn into the right field.”

The stories of The Bride of Innisfallen and Other Stories (1955) are set both in the American South and in Europe. Also included are two stories from the 1960s, “Where Is the Voice Coming From?”, based on the shooting of Medgar Evers, and “The Demonstrators.”

A selection of nine literary and personal essays includes evocations of the Jackson, Mississippi, of her youth that is essential to her work (“The Little Store,” “A Sweet Devouring”) and cogent discussions of literary form (“Writing and Analyzing a Story,” “Place in Fiction”). The volume concludes with One Writer’s Beginnings (1984), the sensitive memoir of her childhood, which has become one of the most widely read of her books.

LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.
Book 1
One of the most influential writers of the twentieth century, Eudora Welty’s novels and stories blend the storytelling tradition of the South with a modernist sensibility attuned to the mysteries and ambiguities of experience. In this Library of America volume and its companion, Welty explores the complex abundance of southern, and particularly Southern women’s, lives with an artistry that Salman Rushdie has called “impossible to overpraise.” In a career spanning five decades, she chronicled her own Mississippi with a depth and intensity matched only by William Faulkner.

Complete Novels gathers all of Welty’s longer fiction in one volume for the first time. In The Robber Bridegroom (1942), based on a Grimm fairy tale, legendary figures from Mississippi’s past, such as the keel-boat captain Mike Fink and the savage outlaws the Harp Brothers, mingle with Welty’s own imaginings in a free-ranging and boisterous fantasy set along the Natchez Trace.

The richly textured Delta Wedding (1946), set against a backdrop of rural Mississippi in the 1920s, vividly portrays the intricacies of family relationships in its account of the sprawling Fairchild clan—with their “family trait of quick, upturning smiles, instant comprehension of the smallest eddy of life in the current of the day, which would surely be entered in a kind of reckless pleasure”—and their Delta plantation Shellmound.

Edna Earle Ponder’s unrestrained and delightfully absurd monologue, superb in its capturing of the rhythms of country speech, shows Welty’s humor at its idiomatic best in The Ponder Heart (1954), a flight of invention culminating in a murder trial that becomes an occasion for exuberant comedy.

The monumental Losing Battles (1970), composed over fifteen years, brings Welty’s imaginative gifts to the largest canvass of her career, rendering a Depression-era family reunion with mythic scope and ebullient comic vigor.

The volume concludes with The Optimist’s Daughter (1972), a taut and moving story of a woman rediscovering the world of her childhood as she comes to terms with her father’s death. Often considered her masterpiece, it won the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 1972.

LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.

Find other titles in

Back to Top